Research Lung Cancer: Stop Smoking, Lung Cells Can Come Back Healthy

Research Lung Cancer: Stop Smoking, Lung Cells Can Come Back Healthy - People who become heavy smokers throughout their lives still have a chance to reduce the risk of lung cancer. A study conducted by scientists claims a finding that offers hope for heavy smokers.

Research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and University College London found terrific results in heavy smokers who quit entirely. Those who stop completely have more lung cells that are genetically back to health. The new healthy cells replenish their lining of the airways.

Bad cells will slowly be less likely to develop into cancer cells in the future. People who have been heavy smokers for 30-40 years or more, many say it is too late to quit, even though it is not at all.
Credits: Pixabay 
"What is very interesting in our research? We point out that it's never too late to stop. Some people in our study had smoked more than 15 thousand packs of cigarettes during their lives, but within a few years stopped, then their lungs showed the excellent condition, "said one of the Wellcome Sanger Institute scientists and senior author of the study, Dr. Peter Campbell.

According to Cancer Research UK, of the 47 thousand lung cancer cases reported in the UK each year, around 72 percent are believed to be the result of smoking. As many as 21 cents of them died.

The study, published in the journal Nature, saw researchers analyzing lung biopsies from 16 people. Including groups of smokers, ex-smokers, and those who have never smoked, even children.

The results showed that nine out of every 10 lung cells in smokers currently have 10 thousand additional genetic mutations. This is a direct result of tobacco chemicals when compared to non-smokers.

Meanwhile, more than a quarter of the damaged cells have at least one cancer-triggering mutation. But in those who stopped smoking, the researchers found a relatively large group of cells lining the airways, which escaped genetic damage from smoking in the past.

The cells were found to be equivalent to those who had never smoked. So that former smokers can also maintain healthy cells four times better than their colleagues who still smoke.

But the researchers caution that if you already have the risk of more profound permanent damage in the lungs, then the possibility of having chronic lung disease is still present. 

Going forward, it still needs further research on a more significant number of people to explore more about cancer in smokers.

No comments for "Research Lung Cancer: Stop Smoking, Lung Cells Can Come Back Healthy"

Subscribe via Email